Keynote 1: RACHEL LLOYD

GIRLS LIKE US: THE COMMERCIAL SEXUAL EXPLOITATION & TRAFFICKING OF GIRLS IN THE U.S.

This keynote will address the interrelated issues of commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC) and domestic trafficking in the United States. It will explain the risk factors that make girls and young women vulnerable to exploitation and trafficking as well as common pathways into the sex industry. Founded  in 1998, GEMS is a nationally recognized organization and is now the largest service provider to commercially sexually exploited and domestically trafficked youth in the U.S. Rachel Lloyd will discuss its unique model of holistic care, including comprehensive case management, trauma-informed systems of care and survivor leadership. 


Keynote 2: DR. JAMES STEWART

WHAT WOULD FREDERICK DOUGLASS DO? AMERICAN HISTORY AND THE PROBLEM OF CONTEMPORARY SLAVERY

Many describe today’s opposition to slavery and human trafficking as a “new abolitionist movement.” So the question to be addressed is: “What can we learn from the original American abolitionists?” How did their situation compare to what we face? What can historical figures such as Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth and William Lloyd Garrison teach us about how to make ourselves better abolitionists?


Keynote 3: REV. ALEXIA SALVATIERRA

HOW CAN FAITH-ROOTED ORGANIZING HELP STOP SLAVERY?

Faith leaders and congregations have unique gifts to contribute to the challenge of stopping slavery – but we need to understand the full spectrum of the gifts that faith can bring and how faith leaders and organizations can collaborate effectively with a range of diverse groups. Faith-rooted organizing is a set of emerging tools being used around the world to release the full power of faith to respond to a variety of human needs. 


Keynote 4: CHARLES LEE

LEADING INNOVATION

Innovation is essential for organizations and companies that seek to thrive in our world. This session will explore some of the commonly shared perspectives and practices of leading brands and organizations that have successfully diverged from the norm in order to create innovative ideas and solutions. Leaders will walk away with tangible ideas for creating innovative cultures that produce results for their respective teams, organizations, and collective endeavors. 


Breakout: DR. STEWART, SHELTON GREEN, SARA BRINTON, AND JESSICA GOUDEAU

INTERSECTION OF BUSINESS, HISTORY, & SLAVERY

When corporate America outsourced production, it also outsourced responsibility. This applies to us as individuals, a country, and our government. When everything happens half a world away, the determining factor becomes the bottom line cost at an acceptable quality. In 1960 90% of all goods purchased in America were made in America. Today, only 5% of goods purchased here are made in America. Since this change began, a “race to the bottom” ensued. Factories around the world are fighting a bloody battle to get production contracts, and the victims are the poorest among us who have no power to push back and countries that don’t always respect the rule of law. Join Dr. Stewart, Shelton Green, Sara Brinton, and Jessica Goudeau to discuss how historical abolitionist practices can inform a better way forward in the world of business.


Breakout: MAYA PILGRIM

DEVELOPING A CULTURE OF PRIMARY PREVENTION

At the core of human trafficking is the exploitative act of turning human beings into objects and commodities for profit. Primary prevention is the concept of preventing trafficking from happening in the first place. Join Maya as she examines the elements of our culture that reinforce forced labor and exploitation, the implantation of sexual violence and gender within the system and the ways to advocate for policy and social norms change to protect people rather than make them vulnerable.


Breakout: ANDREA SPARKS

PREVENTION AND INTERVENTION 

In 2014, 1 in every 6 endangered runaways reported to NCMEC was likely a victim of child sex trafficking and of these children, 68% were in the care of child welfare when they went missing. This presentation will educate audiences about why children in and running from the child welfare system are especially vulnerable to exploitation and what the community can do to prevent victimization. The presentation will also cover new laws and policies to address exploitation of children in care.


Breakout: LATASHA MORRISON, SHERWYN PATTON, AND ELOISE SEPEDA

BUILDING BRIDGES OF JUSTICE AND UNITY

Protecting our most vulnerable populations from trafficking means building bridges of restorative justice and education. In this session you will learn how to begin to change the trajectory of the most vulnerable communities through Restorative Justice initiatives. You will discover how race plays a role with many who fall prey to trafficking in America and how we can begin to change the outcomes. 


Breakout: BROOKE AXTELL, LARAMIE GORBETT, AND SJ MURRAY

THE POWER OF ART FOR SOCIAL CHANGE

Art has the power to heal individuals and communities by transforming trauma and offering a catalyst for change. In this session, we will illustrate how to use art to tell survivor stories, educate your community and create a social movement. Presenters will draw from personal and professional experience in advocacy, activism and the arts with a specific focus on how to serve survivors of human trafficking.


Breakout: MARGARET DUNN

APPLYING A TRAUMA-INFORMED INTERVENTION APPROACH TO SERVING SURVIVORS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING

This breakout session will entail thinking through the challenges you face in working with human trafficking survivors. It will help you to refine your interventions from a complex trauma lens, using a conceptual approach, rather than a content-based model, which can be applied to various stages and types of work with survivors.


Breakout: VEDNITA CARTER

PROSTITUTION: AN EXTENSION OF SLAVERY

Prostitution is often referred to as the world’s oldest profession, when it is in fact the world’s oldest oppression. In this breakout session, we will uncover the parallels between pimp-controlled prostitution and pre-civil war era slavery. This presentation will explore sex trafficking as modern day slavery, while addressing racial, gender, and economic inequality as contributing factors to the perpetual victimization and criminalization of this population.


Micro Talk: KIRSTA MELTON 

JUSTICE FOR ALL

This micro talk is an exhortation for each of us to begin to recognize the justice issues surrounding trafficking – whether that is the criminal prosecution of traffickers, our role as jurors in the parsing of facts and circumstances, our moral and societal obligation to come alongside and reintegrate victims, or the need for a change in our values and perspective as the potential users and buyers of forced labor. Justice means more than someone having his/her day in court. It will call listeners to action in their relationships, activities, families, and companies and remind us of a duty to those who do not share in the freedom that we so often take for granted. 


Micro Talk: BROOKE AXTELL

THE RISE OF SURVIVOR VOICES: TRANSFORMING TRAUMA INTO HOPE

As the movement to end human trafficking in the U.S. grows, communities and organizations face many challenges, including how to effectively engage and honor survivor voices. How do we reveal the truth about sex-trafficking without exploiting survivors for their stories? How can we cultivate empathy and understanding without pushing for specific, traumatic details? How do we elevate survivors to positions of leadership without using them in ways that feel similar to their original abuse? We will discuss how stories can be empowering tools of transformation as well as how narratives of exploitation may re-victimize those who have overcome human trafficking. 


Micro Talk: CHELSEA McCULLOUGH

COMPLEXITY

We all want to make the world a better place. And we all do, in our own ways. Our hearts call us to certain issues, and we want to help. And then we start diving in. And then it gets...hard. Yes we want to be a slave-free city. Then we start defining it. Then we start making choices. Then we realize, this is complicated. I would like to tell the story of my own version of complexity around choosing to wear only ethically traded clothing. On the surface, it’s so simple. But when you really commit, it’s complex. My goal with this discussion is to make it okay for us to say “woah, I’m overwhelmed” and then help each other in the “not knowing.” When we get overwhelmed and realize we don’t have all of the answers, that’s when we want to quit. We want certainty and control. BUT if we can hang in there, and help each other through the complexity, we start to change ourselves, and then help others, then heal a community, then heal a world.